Corporate Responsibility

Kimco announces first LEED-certified project

Posted by: Geoff Glazer Geoff Glazer
on July 31, 2014
LOOKING BACK: Groundbreaking day at Wilde Lake. Pictured left to right: Scott Zimmerly, Wood Partners; Councilwoman Courtney Watson; Bill Santos, Planning Board; Linda Odum, Chairwoman of the Village Board; Councilwoman Mary Kay Sigaty; Geoffrey Glazer, Kimco Realty; Ken Ulman, County Executive; Councilwoman Jen Terrasa; Marsha McLaughlin, Director of Planning; Tom Simmons, Kimco Realty; Kevin Allen, Kimco Realty

LOOKING BACK: Groundbreaking day at Wilde Lake. Pictured left to right: Scott Zimmerly, Wood Partners; Councilwoman Courtney Watson; Bill Santos, Planning Board; Linda Odum, Chairwoman of the Village Board; Councilwoman Mary Kay Sigaty; Geoffrey Glazer, Kimco Realty; Ken Ulman, County Executive; Councilwoman Jen Terrasa; Marsha McLaughlin, Director of Planning; Tom Simmons, Kimco Realty; Kevin Allen, Kimco Realty

When Kimco broke ground on the redevelopment project at Wilde Lake Village Center in Columbia, Maryland, the mission was clear: revitalize the once-bustling Village Center into a hub of retail and activity that would simultaneously create value for the local community and our company. But there is one aspect of this project that we haven’t highlighted in detail to date — the Wilde Lake Village Center redevelopment is one of the first Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) projects Kimco has pursued.

The LEED standard was established by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) in 2000 as a third-party certification program and national benchmark for green buildings. Over time, LEED has influenced the way buildings and communities are designed, constructed, maintained, and operated. Today, LEED serves as a framework for new construction and other project types, providing a checklist of green building attributes and a means of verifying that individual projects have met leading design criteria.

TRANSFORMING WILDE LAKE: An aerial view of the redevelopment project

TRANSFORMING WILDE LAKE: An aerial view of the redevelopment project

By following a comprehensive set of project guidelines, the Wilde Lake redevelopment project is now well on its way to achieving LEED for Building Design & Construction certification. Here’s just some of what’s been going on at the center as we add finishing touches to our first LEED project.

On-site storm water management. A new water management facility is being built under the pervious pavers in our renovated parking lot that will allow for on-site filtration of storm water. These special, porous pavers allow storm water to soak through the material and infiltrate into the ground, minimizing runoff and efficiently filtering the runoff before it’s flushed through the piping system and dispersed off the property. The capacity of on-site infrastructure has been designed for a potential 100-year flood event.

MAPPING IT OUT: The team at Wilde Lake discusses the day's plan

MAPPING IT OUT: The team at Wilde Lake discusses the day’s plan

Efficient lighting. We’ve strategically cut the number of outdated, 40-foot light poles throughout the center. The new design now features energy-efficient lighting and will improve lighting uniformity and quality. The new lights will reduce illumination spill-over into bordering residential areas, yet produce stronger pedestrian lighting at street level, creating a more comfortable environment for our neighbors and the community.

Thoughtful landscaping. As part of the initiative, we reimagined the aesthetics of the center and have significantly enhanced the landscaping of the courtyard and parking lot, all while simultaneously improving signage visibility for our tenants. Notably, the Wilde Lake courtyard has 40 years of history and is home to a tree planted by visionary developer James Rouse. Today, that tree still grows in his honor, but will be surrounded by lush new plantings that have also been incorporated throughout the complex.

HARD AT WORK: Crews prepare the land for construction and development

HARD AT WORK: Crews prepare the land for construction and development

Many of the plants are native species to the region, and a new irrigation system will keep them healthy throughout the year, minimizing the cost and time of replanting.

New buildings and upgrades to existing buildings. We are working with Wood Partners to construct an entirely new building type at the center. This new mixed-use building will combine residential and retail space and will feature sustainable materials, and energy-efficient roofing, HVAC units, walls, and window panes. The retail portion of the structure will be complemented by 230 multi-family units above it.  We’ll also be adding a second mixed-use structure, this one a mix of retail (David’s Natural Market) and office space.  Finally, we will be constructing  a new CVS/pharmacy drugstore building.

In addition, Kimco is pursuing renovations to the existing structures at Wilde Lake, including the office space above the retail storefronts. We installed a new roof for improved insulation, sustainable lighting methods throughout the common space, energy-efficient HVAC in the shared bathrooms, and a new vertical elevator that is ADA compliant.

Involving tenants. Wilde Lake tenants are getting on board with this project, recognizing the value of going green. Organic food store David’s Natural Market, for example, is using only the newest refrigerants throughout the shop. Across many of our properties nationwide, we have seen great effort by many retailers to incorporate sustainable business practices into their operations, and we applaud each of those initiatives.

At Kimco, our real estate footprint is large, and so is our commitment to protecting and preserving the environment. Check out the renderings below to see just some of what the future holds at Wilde Lake Village Center.

PICTURE THIS: A vision of the Wilde Lake courtyard, looking west

PICTURE THIS: A vision of the Wilde Lake courtyard, looking west

VIEW FROM THE TOP: A depiction of the Wilde Lake courtyard, and historic James Rouse tree

VIEW FROM THE TOP: A depiction of the Wilde Lake courtyard, and historic James Rouse tree

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